• Daveyborn@lemmy.world
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    1 month ago

    Honestly it’s usually been my direct boss who’s bought us pizza out of pocket and he’s just as irritated with the company as me.

  • mkwt@lemmy.world
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    1 month ago

    Those pizzas look a lot better than the typical office pizza party I’ve seen.

  • fjordbasa@lemmy.world
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    1 month ago

    I read this like the milkshake scene from “There Will Be Blood”

    I. EAT. YOUR. PIZZA! I EAT IT UP!

  • Flying Squid@lemmy.world
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    1 month ago

    Not eating the pizza would send a better message.

    Imagine the bosses throwing their employees a pizza party and the day ends and everyone goes home and no one has eaten a single slice.

    • TunaCowboy@lemmy.world
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      1 month ago

      They’d just rant about ungrateful employees and internalize it as some kind of persecution, refusing to acknowledge the likely privilege they’ve enjoyed their entire life.

      • SpaceCowboy@lemmy.ca
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        1 month ago

        “They think they’re too good for pizza because we’re paying them too much!”

    • ch00f@lemmy.world
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      1 month ago

      I think getting people to turn down free pizza is a lot more difficult than getting them to join a union.

      • Flying Squid@lemmy.world
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        30 days ago

        I am fine with that. Honestly. Let’s stop trying to make work “fun” with things like pizza “parties” where you have 20 minutes to eat some cold pizza and then get back to work and make up for the time you spent eating the pizza.

  • Kit@lemmy.blahaj.zone
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    1 month ago

    I’m in a union and still get pizza parties from my manager because he’s awesome and likes to get his employees lunch (out of his own pocket) during tough projects. It’s nice to take a half hour to chit chat over a meal before getting back to the grind.

  • PhlubbaDubba@lemm.ee
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    1 month ago

    Better yet, just make your own, no pizza better than the one you make yourself, plus you can use the actually good ingredients

    • PugJesus@lemmy.worldOP
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      1 month ago

      ‘Anyway’ is the correct form. ‘Anyways’ is the same, but informal/‘incorrect’.

      • raspberriesareyummy@lemmy.world
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        1 month ago

        Confusing I guess, I always assumed “anyways” to be a different word (grammatically) without ever having a clear idea with one being an adverb, what the other could be… clownface

          • raspberriesareyummy@lemmy.world
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            30 days ago

            interesting that etymology of the word explains the origin of both forms - “in any way” vs. “any ways” - which makes sense to my ears, as “in” only fits a singular way “in a way”, not “in a ways”.

            Which also means that both are grammatically correct but it makes it understandable how some people would prefer the “anyways” form with the “in” word no longer being used.

        • Mouselemming@sh.itjust.works
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          1 month ago

          Personally, I would definitely use anyway here, where it stands for “even so.” I might be more likely to say “Anyways, I’ll say goodbye now because I have to pick up my kids” where it’s really just transitional. (Anyhow or the very informal anyhoo could be used that way as well.) In sentences where it means “in any case” such as, “I can drop your books at the library, I was going there for Drag Queen Story Hour anyway” I wouldn’t add the s but if someone did I wouldn’t notice.

          There! That’s much more confusing, isn’t it?

          • raspberriesareyummy@lemmy.world
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            30 days ago

            Yeah, after posting it occurred to me how I would describe the two different ways in which I use the word:

            1. “one way or another”, “that being said” / “further” -> your example “Anyways, I’ll say goodbye now […]”

            2. “despite that” / “nevertheless” -> “Junk food is not healthy, but I’m gonna have a burger anyway[s]”

            to which you added a third meaning(?) which, now that I try to describe it in other words, also appears to me as best translated with 3) “one way or another” / “this is happening independently of what is currently being discussed” -> your example “I was going there fore Drag Queen Story Hour anyway”